Welcome 

The Aging, Metabolism, and Emotions (AME) Center is at the UCSF Center for Health and Community.  AME researchers study a range of topics on how people can thrive in both mind and body, especially when under severe adversity (poverty, caregiving, work stress, depression).  We conduct basic translational and intervention research with the goal of improving healthspan, from conception to our golden years.  We are particularly interested in resilience to aging, enhancing coping and emotion regulation, and daily lifestyle (optimizing restorative behaviors of sleep, activity, social connectivity, purpose in life).  Our website shares projects, publications, events, and highlights new findings and opportunities.  Join our newsletter to stay connected! 


                 WHO WE ARE

                 WHO WE ARE

          FEATURED LECTURES

          FEATURED LECTURES

          CURRENT RESEARCH

          CURRENT RESEARCH

            UPCOMING EVENTS

            UPCOMING EVENTS

 

Stay aware of current events related to our research. 

 

We are excited to be a semi-finalist for the Mood challenge for the Apple ResearchKit! Our project is called MoodSync.  Our team includes Ashley Mason, Rashida Brown, Eve Ekman, Alexandra Croswell, Wendy Mendes and Elissa Epel.  Stay tuned to see how our app develops! 

"Refugees who fled to Europe a generation ago are significantly more likely to have developed type 2 diabetes if they initially settled in poor neighborhoods, according to a study of 60,000 refugees who came to Sweden between 1987 and 1991."

"Breast-fed babies have healthier immune systems, score higher on I.Q. tests and may be less prone to obesity than other babies.

Now new research reveals another possible difference in breast-fed babies: They may have longer telomeres."

"As part of the initiative, Yes Health will develop opt-in tools that provide its users the opportunity to share important de-identified behavioral data, such as diet, exercise, and sleep patterns, with UC San Francisco researchers focused on both type 2 diabetes and prediabetes."